NY Grandmother Gives Account of Conditions at US/Mexico Border

Grandmother.jpg

'Going to the Border and Seeing the Conditions with My Own Eyes Was Shocking'
By Rachna Daryanani

I’m a grandmother of four, but all the kids in my neighborhood in Queens, New York, seem to believe I’m their grandma, which I encourage.

In the last few years I have become aware of the rise in an attitude of “you versus me.” The “us” in U.S.A. seems to be slowly fading away, and it bothers me tremendously.

I came to the United States in 1984 from Mumbai, India, as a young mother of two, and have worked hard to thank the country of my choice for giving me the chance to better myself.

To read more, click here. Article originally appeared in the August 2019 GR/AR newsletter.

ONE YEAR LATER...

Today we celebrate, not the indignities of immigration laws and rules put forth, not the separation of children which we protested against (which is still happening), not the deaths of immigrant children that were in Border Control's care, not this administration's undying efforts to make seeking asylum more and more difficult.

Today we step back to take just a moment to celebrate the union of 30 people from the Beacon, NY area who traveled in a caravan through six states last July 31st, to peacefully protest the separation of children and arrived at the border 200 strong, and the fact that we have continued our organization and now have many groups and hundreds of volunteers across the nation - hundreds and hundreds of people who care about humanity, the rights of people to seek asylum in our county, and their right to be treated with dignity. We celebrate the many like-minded hearts and minds of people who have stepped up and volunteered by:

• Organizing Grannies Respond groups in several cities
• Fundraising
• Shopping or procuring donated goods
• Making up kits including hygiene products, snacks, and more
• Going to bus stations day after day to hand to out these kits and to ensure the safe passage of asylum-seekers across the country
• Making a documentary about us called "From Beacon to the Border"
• Participating in press, video, Facebook, magazine, and internet articles
• Aligning us with like-minded groups to strengthen our united work
• Going to the border to assist our partner organizations: The Angry Tias and Abuelas, Catholic Charities Humanitarian Respite Center, and Team Brownsville 
• Arranging for Clark University students to participate in an internship program to volunteer at the border for a month
• Donating legal services and time
• Donating money
• Helping formalize Grannies Respond as a 501(c)3 non-profit organization
• Participating as members of our wonderful Board of Directors, which enables us to continue to raise awareness and be a conduit for those who want to help

Today we celebrate you! Thank you to all who have contributed to create and expand Grannies Respond / Abuelas Responden, Inc. so we could sustain our ability to serve.
Happy Birthday Grannies! 💖

Catherine Cole and Beth Yeager
Co-Executive Directors Grannies Respond / Abuelas Responden, Inc.

Shelburne Falls native volunteers at southern border

Halley Glier stands with three of her classmates at a respite center for asylum seekers in McAllen, Texas. Glier has been volunteering at the center for the past three weeks. Contributed photo

Halley Glier stands with three of her classmates at a respite center for asylum seekers in McAllen, Texas. Glier has been volunteering at the center for the past three weeks. Contributed photo

McALLEN, Texas — As the southern border floods with people seeking refuge in the United States, last month Halley Glier of Shelburne Falls took a bus to Texas with her college classmates to offer some support.

Glier, 22, a graduate of Mohawk Trail Regional School, has been volunteering for the past three weeks at Catholic Charities Respite Center in McAllen, Texas.

“My overall experience has been amazing,” Glier said. “I’ve been able to learn a lot about the immigration system in general from all of the people around me. Respite requires so much constant adaptation and figuring out how to best function … I like to think that I’ve gotten this skill down over my three weeks, but there’s always more to learn.”

To read more, click here.

Group of local grandmas lead 'overground migrant railroad'

As the nation stands divided over immigration, a group of grandmothers, are showing compassion toward migrants being let out of detention centers.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – At first, it was a running joke for Sharon and Beth.

Their 4-person mission has grown exponentially since last year when the pair had a real moral crisis on how they can help families, mothers, fathers, and children separated at the US-Mexico border.

“When we first started this mission, it was just three Presbyterian women and an 89-year-old priest,” Sharon Kutz-Mellem said. Now, the group totals nearly 200 volunteers.

To read more, click here.

Podcast: Chris Goudreau on Valley residents responding to the border crisis

Chris Goudreau, associate editor of the Valley Advocate, speaks with editor Dave Eisenstadter about his recent cover story, “From the Valley to the Border: Sickening news on the treatment of migrants inspiring locals to travel down to help.” Hear how he developed the story, speaking to members of Serving Asylum Seekers, Team Brownsville, and Grannies Respond, and what local residents will be doing at the Mexican border.

Read more here: https://valleyadvocate.com/2019/07/15/podcast-chris-goudreau-on-valley-residents-responding-to-the-border-crisis

'Leaders of Tomorrow' Series: Clark University Students Providing Assistance to Asylum Seekers at US-Mexico Border

Katie Larrivee is pictured with another volunteer.

Katie Larrivee is pictured with another volunteer.

The following report was provided by Grannies Respond/Abuelas Responden.

WORCESTER, MA — On June 26, seven students from Clark University in Worcester traveled to McAllen, Texas, where they will spend the next several weeks providing assistance to asylum seekers entering the United States at its border with Mexico.

To read more, click here.

From the Valley to the Border: Sickening news on the treatment of migrants inspiring locals to travel down to help

Screenshot 2019-07-06 at 10.32.56 AM.png

Sharon Lehmann, 69, was watching the news on TV at her home in Granby more than a month ago and saw a story about militia groups aiming guns at migrant families. She turned to her partner, Audrey Walker, 66, and said, “I can’t watch this. I just can’t do this anymore. I have to do something.”

An online search for ways to get involved led the couple to reach out to Texas-based volunteer organization Team Brownsville, one of many groups offering food, water, and other assistance at the border. Soon, Lehmann and Walker formed their own local group: Serving Asylum Seekers.

To read more, click here.

From Beacon to the Border: A documentary on the Grannies Respond caravan

Netroots Nation Screening Series:   SHOWCASE: “FROM BEACON TO THE BORDER” AND “RESISTERHOOD”   Screening Series; Thu, 07/11/2019 - 12:00pm  Film showcases present several films in one session by showing multiple short films or clips, then inviting a presenter from each film to participate in a moderated discussion. “From Beacon to the Border” is a 35-minute documentary by Andrea Garbarini following a national movement of grannies as they journey to McAllen, Texas protesting the separation of migrant children from their families. “Resisterhood” captures the stories of everyday Americans who became grassroots activists working tirelessly to defend our democracy and stop the erosion of our civil rights.

Netroots Nation Screening Series:
SHOWCASE: “FROM BEACON TO THE BORDER” AND “RESISTERHOOD”

Screening Series; Thu, 07/11/2019 - 12:00pm

Film showcases present several films in one session by showing multiple short films or clips, then inviting a presenter from each film to participate in a moderated discussion. “From Beacon to the Border” is a 35-minute documentary by Andrea Garbarini following a national movement of grannies as they journey to McAllen, Texas protesting the separation of migrant children from their families. “Resisterhood” captures the stories of everyday Americans who became grassroots activists working tirelessly to defend our democracy and stop the erosion of our civil rights.